Mobile esports

What's going on with esports on lesser-known streaming platforms in 2020?

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What's going on with esports on lesser-known streaming platforms in 2020?

When it comes to watching esports, live-streaming platforms are usually the primary method of spectating gaming competitions. The majority of the western world would pick Twitch as their go-to platform for watching their favourite esport. However, there is a great number of other gaming-oriented streaming services out there, each with different features, area of focus and approach. 

To find out more about what's going on with esports on other, lesser-known streaming platforms, as well as to provide an insight into their approach towards esports, we reviewed the 2020 esports viewership statistics of four of them, namely Booyah!, Nimo TV, Trovo Live and Mildom. 

Booyah!

Launched in 2020 by Singaporean game developer and publisher Garena, Booyah! is a live-streaming platform dedicated to Garena Free Fire. Although Booyah! is not restricted to only one title, its features are very much catered to the Free Fire audience. The app can generate Free Fire match highlights and allows players to link their game accounts with the app, or even create custom lobbies to play with or against their audience.

Booyah!’s approach is very community-oriented and offers a variety of interactive features, such as reward and partner programs, drop-enabled streams and a ranking system based on the popularity of streamers. The platform regularly hosts Free Fire tournaments with in-game, as well as real money prizes, along with a variety of special streamer events.

In 2020, Booyah!’s audience spent in total 15 million hours watching competitive Free Fire, peaking at 427K concurrent viewers

Created primarily as an app, the platform is focused on LATAM, India and Brazil markets. Correspondingly, the majority (79,68%) of esports watched on Booyah! in 2020 was in Portuguese. The rest of Booyah!’s audience speaks Hindi (9,56%), Spanish (9,49%) and Arabic (0,96%).

Nimo TV

As a subsidiary of the Chinese live-streaming platform HUYA, Nimo TV entered markets of Southeast Asia and Latin America in May 2018 after receiving an investment from Chinese tech conglomerate Tencent.

Nimo TV is available on both mobile platforms, as well as online, although its content consists mostly of mobile games. In 2020, the platform broadcasted 1129 hours of various esports, reaching 176K peak viewers and a total of 9.4 million hours watched

The most popular esport on the platform was PUBG Mobile (38,56% of total hours watched), followed by Arena of Valor (24,10%), Mobile Legends: Bang Bang (17,05%) and Free Fire (15,07%). 

Non-mobile esports were watched in lower numbers, namely Valorant (2,51%), PUBG (2,42%), League of Legends (0,11%) and Dota 2 (0,11%).

Nimo TV is known for hosting PUBG Mobile, Free Fire and Valorant tournaments, as well as operating NimoTv PUBG Mobile League (NPL) in India and organising special streamer tournaments. Moreover, the platform offers its streamers training programs or assistance in organising their own events.

Nimo TV’s language composition is fairly varied, with most of the esports broadcast watched in Indonesian (36,38%), Thai (19,98%), Portuguese (17,71%), Hindi (17,17%), Spanish (5,66%) and Vietnamese (2,35%). 

Trovo Live

Tencent-owned Trovo Live launched in March 2020, ambitious to challenge current market leaders Twitch and YouTube. However, when it comes to competing with the streaming elites, the new platform has still a long way to go. In nine months of its existence, Trovo’s esports streams recorded 461 hours of air time, reaching 115K HW and a peak of 3K concurrent viewers.

Even though Trovo claims to focus on mobile titles, this isn’t too apparent, as its home page features mostly the titles popular in the western world, namely PUBG Mobile, GTA V, Fortnite, League of Legends, CS:GO, Call of Duty: Mobile, Minecraft and so on. 

Trovo’s esports viewership report confirms the dominance of PC disciplines, with League of Legends making 65,94% of total hours watched in 2020, followed by StarCraft II (15,06%), Call of Duty: Mobile (13,10%), PUBG Mobile (3,09%) and Valorant (2,81%). 

The platform recently decided to support competitive League of Legends and became an official broadcasting partner of LEC, which means we might expect an increase in League of Legends viewership on Trovo in 2021. 

Just like the aforementioned streaming platforms, Trovo is also engaged in organising esports events, specifically the Trovo Challenge, a Valorant tournament in collaboration with esports tournament platform GLL, or the Trovo Holiday Royale in collaboration with Allied Esports. 

The majority of Trovo’s audience watches the tournaments in English (97,73%), the rest speaks Korean (2,21%) and Spanish (0,06%).

Mildom

Mildom, owned by Chinese streaming service DouYu International Holdings, is a rising Japanese live streaming platform keen on Apex Legends. During 403 hours of esports broadcast in 2020, the platform hit 569K HW, peaking at 147K concurrent viewers.

The most-watched esport on Mildom is Apex Legends (86,30%), followed by League of Legends (6,32%), Valorant (4,97%), Street Fighter V (2,24%) and Tom Clancy’s Rainbow Six Siege (0,18%). 

In 2020, Mildom hosted eight editions of Apex Legends tournament series named Mildom Open. Furthermore, it became the first tournament organiser in the world to debut a Valorant league. Its $23,000 Mildom Masters kicked off in August, only two months after the release of Riot’s new tactical shooter.

Esports draw viewership

As can be seen, different markets favour different titles, but the passion for esports is present worldwide. Based on these examples of relatively new and growing streaming platforms, it seems that broadcasting and organising esports tournaments became an inseparable part of building a gaming-focused live streaming platform. This comes as no surprise, considering that competitions usually tend to draw much higher viewership numbers than routine streaming. 

With the ever-growing popularity of competitive gaming, we can assume that streaming platforms will continue and even expand their esports activities. For the foreseeable future, Twitch is most likely to remain on its viewership throne, with YouTube and Facebook gaming being just behind.

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